Tech Topics

The Joys of Interconnectivity

Posted on Friday, May 17th, 2013

Automated lighting programming often encompasses more than adjusting intensities and moving lights around a stage. Quite often, we find ourselves in circumstances that require intense planning, understanding and interconnectivity of lighting elements.
Whether programming a concert, corporate event, television show or any other production, there are always opportunities to expand the playback capacities through advanced programming. The automated lighting programmer must be able to understand the needs of the production as well as the capabilities of the console in order to create the required interconnectivity of lighting playbacks.

Written by: Brad Schiller

Automated lighting programming often encompasses more than adjusting intensities and moving lights around a stage. Quite often, we find ourselves in circumstances that require intense planning, understanding and interconnectivity of lighting elements.

Whether programming a concert, corporate event, television show or any other production, there are always opportunities to expand the playback capacities through advanced programming. The automated lighting programmer must be able to understand the needs of the production as well as the capabilities of the console in order to create the required interconnectivity of lighting playbacks.

To read the full article click here http://www.plsn.com/current-issue/42-feeding-the-machines/11098-the-joys-of-interconnectivity.html

 

Lighting for Video – The Evolution of Cool

Posted on Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Written by Paul Berliner

The history of lighting dates back to a distant time when there wasn’t any artificial lighting at all. In fact, in the early days, some film studios were designed with a rotating open roof to allow the maximum amount of natural light to fill the stage. Film companies moved to Hollywood in droves, where natural light was plentiful. Inevitably, directors wanted to film in the evenings, and they had the audacity to want a little “visual mood” in their scenes. Thankfully, along came Thomas Edison, followed closely by Mr. Mole, Mr. Richardson, and the Kliegl Brothers. Suddenly, the “electric” lighting industry was born.

Read the full article at:  http://www.plsn.com/current-issue/26-video-world/10895-lighting-for-video-the-evolution-of-cool.html

 

Set in a Bag

Posted on Tuesday, April 9th, 2013

Written by: Nook Schoenfeld

Each year I get a few calls from bands looking for a set or lighting design for their tour. It’s always an exciting process as I let my imagination run for a few days before I start putting pencil to paper. Last month, I got a call from a booking agent looking to hook me up with one of her new acts. So I contacted the management company and they emailed me a response. “Before we chat, take a listen to this music and let us know if this is something you would be interested in.” Nobody has ever approached me in this manner before. I had not thought I heard the band’s name previously.

Read the full article at http://www.plsn.com/current-issue/35-ld-at-large/10888-set-in-a-bag.html

 

Smooth Moves

Posted on Tuesday, March 12th, 2013

Written by: Brad Schiller
Automated lighting fixtures are extremely sophisticated, to the point that some people even refer to them as “intelligent.” While the fixtures are packed full of very smart features, they actually require a human with a bit of knowledge to operate them properly. This is very true when it comes to controlling the movement of pan/tilt or other features. Fixtures and consoles provide a multitude of methods to ensure that these movements are either perfectly smooth or extremely quick. A thorough understanding of the various options is imperative for any automated lighting programmer.

Written by: Brad Schiller

Automated lighting fixtures are extremely sophisticated, to the point that some people even refer to them as “intelligent.” While the fixtures are packed full of very smart features, they actually require a human with a bit of knowledge to operate them properly. This is very true when it comes to controlling the movement of pan/tilt or other features. Fixtures and consoles provide a multitude of methods to ensure that these movements are either perfectly smooth or extremely quick. A thorough understanding of the various options is imperative for any automated lighting programmer.

Read the full article at: http://www.plsn.com/current-issue/42-feeding-the-machines/10731-smooth-moves.html

 

The Next Generation of Media Servers

Posted on Thursday, December 6th, 2012

Written by: Vickie Claiborne

From the early days of DMX-controlled media servers, something has been missing. Missing, that is, until recently. Two of the more recently launched media servers (the Ai media server from Avolites and the d3 media server from d3 Technologies) take video control into the next generation by adding the missing link: real-time video visualization.

That’s right, media server programmers can now pre-visualize video clips, effects and how the full stage looks in real time with the video playing.
Still not sure what this means? Think WYSIWYG or ESPVision for video — but on steroids.

That’s right, media server programmers can now pre-visualize video clips, effects and how the full stage looks in real time with the video playing.

Still not sure what this means? Think WYSIWYG or ESPVision for video — but on steroids.

Read the full article at: http://www.plsn.com/current-issue/39-video-digerati/10134-the-next-generation-of-media-servers.html

 

The Quickest Path, and Other Nifty Colour Tricks

Posted on Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

By Brad Schiller

Automated lighting manufacturers create some amazing products that we programmers are fortunate to get to operate. Quite often, their software developers will implement features that are essential to enhance the lighting experience. It is extremely important that automated lighting programmers are aware of and understand the features that are included within each fixture. Armed with this knowledge, you can achieve the best possible use of the products that you are programming and therefore create the best lighting achievable too.

Read the full article here:  http://www.plsn.com/current-issue/42-feeding-the-machines/10130-the-quickest-path-and-other-nifty-color-tricks.html

 

Lighting Console Developments

Posted on Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

by Michael S. Eddy

Whether you are programming the lighting to playback looks at the touch of a button, running complex, multi-cued presentations, or running the lighting manually with faders, the choice of console can help or hinder your plans. Lighting consoles are the brains of the lighting system, and whether you are a lighting designer who will operate their own lighting design for services and programs or you’re the person tasked with programming and operating the lighting for a guest designer, you will be spending a lot of time with this tool. You will want to take a good look at the features and functions of various consoles, know how those functions might benefit or perhaps slow down cueing, and then decide what console will work for your needs and style of lighting control.

Read the full article at: http://www.churchproduction.com/go.php/article/lighting_console_developments